Women's Attitudes Toward Family Formation and Life Stage Transitions: A Longitudinal Study in Korea

Erin Hye-Won Kim Kim, Adam Ka-Lok Cheung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although it is well documented that family attitudes become less traditional over cohorts, little is known about how individuals' attitudes change over time. More research also is needed on how the within-individual changes relate to important life stage events such as marriage, childbirth, and transitions in education and work. Evidence is particularly lacking in Asian countries, which have socioeconomic and cultural contexts very different from those in the West. To fill these gaps in the literature, the authors analyzed the attitudes toward family formation of Korean women in their 20s and 30s (N = 6,042). Individual fixed effects regression using the panel data from the Korean Longitudinal Survey of Women and Families revealed that women became more traditional over time and that transitions to marriage and motherhood partly accounted for the change. These findings are explained within the context of very low fertility in Korea and have implications for other rapidly changing societies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1074-1090
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume77
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015
Externally publishedYes

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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