Women and self-employment in post-socialist rural China: Side job, individual career or family venture

Jing SONG*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rise of private sector business in urban China has led to more women engaging in low-end self-employment. This study, however, reveals a more complicated story in the countryside. Drawing on in-depth interviews conducted in a Chinese village, this study finds that the women took the lead in developing sideline self-employment and were then attracted to rural wage employment in the 1980s. With the privatization of rural industries and the rise of capital-intensive self-employment in the 1990s, some women were forced into low-end self-employment, but others were attracted to high-end self-employment, forging individual careers and family ventures. In more recent times, younger women have been more inclined to work on-and-off, balancing self-employment pursuits with the desire to be a good mother. This pattern marks a shift from the continuous multitasking practised by the older generation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-242
Number of pages14
JournalChina Quarterly
Volume221
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Mar 2015

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

User-Defined Keywords

  • China
  • family venture
  • individual career
  • self-employment
  • side job
  • women

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Women and self-employment in post-socialist rural China: Side job, individual career or family venture'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this