Why is the Normativity of Logic Based on Rules?

Ahti Veikko Pietarinen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

According to Peirce, normative sciences are the “most purely theoretical of purely theoretical sciences.” At the same time, he takes logic to be a normative science. These two sentences form a highly interesting pair of assertions. Why is logic among the most purely theoretical sciences? What does it actually mean that logic is a normative science? This chapter answers these questions by addressing the question of why the normativity of logic is, as a matter of fact, based on rules.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Normative Thought of Charles S. Peirce
EditorsCornelis de Waal, Krysztof Piotr Skowroński
PublisherFordham University Press
Chapter8
Pages172-184
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9780823250769, 9780823246250
ISBN (Print)0823242447, 9780823242443
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Aug 2012

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

User-Defined Keywords

  • normative sciences
  • logic
  • theoretical science
  • normativity

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