Using interactive whiteboards (IWB) to enhance learning and teaching in Hong Kong schools

Fong Lok Lee*, Sai Wing Pun, Sandy S C LI, Siu Cheung Kong, Wai Hung Ip

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Interactive whiteboard (IWB) has been widely used as a learning tool in the western classrooms since 1991. Many researches reported that the technology benefits students by increasing their engagement in classroom activities, arousing learners' motivation and helping with their knowledge retention[1]. Hong Kong, as a Chinese society has its unique learning culture and environment [2], what benefits western students may not apply there. It is therefore worthwhile to explore the usefulness of IWB in Hong Kong schools. This paper reports on the research of what benefits can bring to Hong Kong students through the teaching with IWB. Result of this study shows that in general teachers and students in Hong Kong welcome the use of IWB in their classrooms.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLearning by Effective Utilization of Technologies
Subtitle of host publicationFacilitating Intercultural Understanding, Proceeding of the 14th International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2006
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event14th International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2006 - Beijing, China
Duration: 30 Nov 20064 Dec 2006

Publication series

NameLearning by Effective Utilization of Technologies: Facilitating Intercultural Understanding, Proceeding of the 14th International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2006

Conference

Conference14th International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2006
Country/TerritoryChina
CityBeijing
Period30/11/064/12/06

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Education

User-Defined Keywords

  • Hong Kong
  • Interactive whiteboards (IWB)
  • Learning and teaching

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