Use of unstructured intervention in a community-based mental health setting for the recovery of people with depression in Hong Kong: A qualitative assessment

Daniel W L Lai*, Vincent W P Lee, Yong-Xin Ruan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This qualitative evaluation study examined the impact of unstructured intervention on people with depression in a community mental health centre in Hong Kong. In the intervention, service users initiated groups and designed group activities by themselves, with social workers as facilitators. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with service users enrolled in unstructured intervention, their family members, and service providers in 2019. Overall, 32 participants were recruited through purposive sampling. The results revealed that peer interactions helped participants to feel accepted and understood. Participants also acquired experience with emotional coping strategies and practised their interpersonal skills, and by learning new skills from peers, they were able to rebuild their self-esteem and improve their relationships with friends and family. To cater to clients' different needs and concerns, unstructured activities should be diversified. Family and social functioning should also be emphasised in the development of unstructured intervention because the generic skills and knowledge acquired from unstructured activities with peers could help to enhance family relationships, self-confidence, and the ability to manage issues related to working and socialising.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalHealth and Social Care in the Community
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Sep 2022

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

User-Defined Keywords

  • depression
  • psychosocial intervention
  • treatment outcome

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