Transition from urge to excessive use of social networking sites: The moderating role of self-control and accessibility

Tommy K.H. Chan, Christy M K CHEUNG, Zach W.Y. Lee, Tillmann Neben

    Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Social networking sites (SNSs) have evolved as the centre for daily social interactions. However, some users experience difficulties in managing their incessant urges to use the site, and result in spending excessive amount of time on the platform. While the research on the dark side of SNS use is gaining momentum, the theoretical understanding of this issue remains limited. In this study, we aim to advance the literature by investigating the development of excessive use of SNSs through the prism of urge. More specifically, we studied the anticipated emotions as the drivers of urge to use SNS. We also explored the impact of internal (i.e., self-control) and external (i.e., accessibility) factor on the urge to use and its transition to excessive use of SNSs. We will test the model with active SNS users using structural equation modelling. We believe that current work will enrich the existing literature on the dark side of SNS use, and raise the awareness in the community regarding this emerging phenomenon.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationPACIS 2015 Proceedings
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015
    Event19th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, PACIS 2015 - Singapore, Singapore
    Duration: 5 Jul 20159 Jul 2015

    Conference

    Conference19th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, PACIS 2015
    Country/TerritorySingapore
    CitySingapore
    Period5/07/159/07/15

    Scopus Subject Areas

    • Information Systems

    User-Defined Keywords

    • Accessibility.
    • Anticipated emotions
    • Excessive use
    • Self-control
    • Social networking sites
    • Urge to use

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