The struggle between subaltern nationalisms and the nation-state in the digital age: China and its ethnic minorities

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Technology-determined understandings of how the Internet can change society are usually not very accurate since the Internet’s impacts are always filtered through the structures and contexts of a particular society. Technological determinism tends to be flawed because it is more often the way in which a society receives and makes use of technologies that defines their technological significance. Perhaps, the Internet should not be simply treated as a transforming agent of society but more importantly as a channel for understanding the functioning of power and struggle in a given society.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRoutledge Handbook of New Media in Asia
EditorsLarissa Hjorth, Olivia Khoo
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter31
Pages352-363
Number of pages12
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781317684978, 9781317684985, 9781315774626
ISBN (Print)9781138026001, 9780367472962
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Nov 2015

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The struggle between subaltern nationalisms and the nation-state in the digital age: China and its ethnic minorities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this