The relation of gender-role classifications to the prosocial and antisocial behavior of chinese adolescents

Hing Keung MA*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The author investigated the relation between gender-role classifications and prosocial and antisocial behavior for 505 Chinese adolescents in grades 7 to 12. The author found that (a) boys were more antisocial than girls were, (b) there was no significant gender difference in prosocial behavior, (c) prosocial behavior was associated positively with both masculinity and femininity, (d) delinquent behavior was associated positively with masculinity, (e) gender-role classification that was consistent with one's biological gender (e.g., femininity in girls) was more salient in predicting one's prosocial behavior than was a gender-role classification that was not consistent with one's gender (e.g., femininity in boys), (f) delinquent behavior in the feminine group was significantly lower than it was in the other 3 gender-role groups (masculine, androgynous, undifferentiated), and (g) adolescents in the undifferentiated group tended to be less prosocial and fairly antisocial, and their social behavioral pattern was the least favorable among the four gender-role classifications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-202
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Genetic Psychology
Volume166
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

User-Defined Keywords

  • Antisocial behavior
  • Gender-role classifications
  • Prosocial behavior

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The relation of gender-role classifications to the prosocial and antisocial behavior of chinese adolescents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this