The Personal is Political: Political Attitudes, Affective Polarization and Fertility Preferences in Hong Kong

Adam Ka-Lok Cheung*, Lake Lui

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between political attitudes, affective polarization, and fertility preferences among married couples in Hong Kong. Using dyadic data from a representative household survey (N = 1586 heterosexually married adults), we investigate how individuals’ attitudes toward democracy and levels of affective polarization are associated with their fertility preferences. We also explore the influence of spouses’ political attitudes and affective polarization on one's fertility preferences. We found that individuals with stronger support for democracy have lower fertility preferences. This negative association between political attitudes and fertility preferences is further amplified by one’s level of affective polarization. The findings of this study contribute to our understanding of how political factors shape fertility patterns in the context of dramatic political transitions. This study provides valuable insights into the complex dynamics between political attitudes, affective polarization, and family formation decisions in Hong Kong, which have both theoretical, policy and political implications.
Original languageEnglish
Article number22
Number of pages23
JournalPopulation Research and Policy Review
Volume43
Early online date15 Mar 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Demography
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

User-Defined Keywords

  • Affective polarization
  • Anti-ELAB movement
  • Fertility preferences
  • Hong Kong
  • Political attitudes
  • Political demography

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