The perceived role of religion in the educational attainment of Pakistani immigrant secondary students in Hong Kong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The academic underachievement of ethnic minorities, especially Pakistanis, in Hong Kong is well-recognized. This is stereotypically attributed to Islamic practices that are perceived to impede education, yet the voices of Pakistani parents and children are seldom heard. This research seeks to illuminate how Pakistani Muslim immigrant students and their parents understand the role of religion in education. The key finding highlights how both parents and students rate religion and education as highly important, and maintain that the two complement—rather than contradict—each other. They reject the public perception that Islam discourages the education of females, asserting that Islam upholds equality, including gender equality. Nonetheless, and maybe paradoxically, females interviewed during this research do encounter greater challenges than males in pursuing an education. In the young women's understanding, this comes from gendered cultural practices that are not necessarily endorsed by Islam. In response, both parents and daughters fight against, or conform to, these practices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-42
JournalAsian anthropology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The perceived role of religion in the educational attainment of Pakistani immigrant secondary students in Hong Kong'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this