The mediated nature of knowledge and the pushing-hands approach to research on translation history

Martha P Y CHEUNG*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article focuses on the mediated nature of knowledge as the key theoretical issue pertaining to research on translation history. It is widely admitted that knowledge in the humanities is not impersonal but situated. Especially heavily mediated is knowledge in the domain of translation history, the difference in time, space and language being particularly difficult challenges for researchers in their attempts to interpret and represent the past. The article offers a critical overview of various established ways of dealing with historical knowledge, and presents what I regard as a most fruitful mode of researching translation history. Borrowing a term from Chinese martial art, I call it the pushing-hands (tuishou) approach to translation history, which seeks to bring the past and the present into dialogic engagement and offer an alternative to the dichotomous thinking characterizing much humanities research today.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-171
Number of pages16
JournalTranslation Studies
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2012

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

User-Defined Keywords

  • Interventionist historiography
  • Pushing-hands
  • Self-reflective historiography
  • Taiji
  • Translation history
  • Translation in China

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