The Master's student learning outcomes and assessment methods: An alternative perspective on pedagogy

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Although current educational priorities tend to avoid strong moral positions, one of the world's most venerable yet persistently influential moral traditions not only lays out a number of major moral principles but also incorporates them into its pedagogy. Confucius teaches us about the importance of seeking knowledge, learning how to learn, applying ancient wisdom to contemporary situations, valuing virtue over material gain, following the Golden Rule, and living by our principles. He also has ways of assessing his own students' progress in these matters.

Confucius' pedagogy is an interesting model to consider and contrast with contemporary models. This chapter introduces these principles and assessments from the Analects and draws out some comparisons to and contrasts with two alternative theories in western moral thought, Augustine and John Dewey.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWhole Person Education in East Asian Universities
Subtitle of host publicationPerspectives from Philosophy and Beyond
EditorsBenedict S. B. Chan, Victor C. M. Chan
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter4
Pages61-73
Number of pages13
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781003137252
ISBN (Print)9780367683788
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Sep 2021

Publication series

NameRoutledge Contemporary Asia Series
PublisherRoutledge

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