The living experience of losing genetic continuity: Concealment tendency in Chinese recipients of donor-assisted conception

Elaine Yin Ling TSUI*, Joanna Oi Yue Cheng

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study explored how Chinese women with donor-assisted conception experienced loss of genetic continuity and managed donor-assisted conception–related information. Through Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, a thematic framework on women’s beliefs, motivation, and behaviors in information management was constructed. Contrary to the Western trend toward disclosure, it was found that Chinese women strongly preferred to conceal, in order to protect their family members, the parent–child relationship, and family stability. Participants’ strong preference was also indicated in specific behaviors that ensure information concealment. The findings of this study may contribute toward the development of culturally sensitive clinical guidelines for counseling practice that supports infertile couples’ decision-making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-542
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Applied Psychology

User-Defined Keywords

  • Chinese
  • donated gametes
  • donor-assisted conception
  • infertility
  • self-concealment

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