The Limits of Primordial Affinity to Ethnic Trust: The Social Origins of Ethnic Trust among North Korean Refugees in London

Hwajin Shin, In-Jin Yoon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Abstract

The creation of trusting relationships with coethnics is identified as a step towards refugee integration. However, coethnic trust has been considered primordial, and empirical explorations on restoring refugees’ capacities to trust their coethnics have remained limited. This study addresses the gap by considering in-group trust decisions as a situational product shaped by contextual conditions using social network data on North Korean refugees settled in London. The network analyses test the effects of contextual arrangements, while accounting for network-level covariates affecting trust decisions. Findings demonstrate that social conditions within the host country support the emergence of trust ties despite the unfavourable pre-migration experiences of refugees. More specifically, a sense of belonging in the host society and placing trust in host government are associated with trusting impulse towards coethnics. The implications from the findings suggest that features of the post-migration environment signal trustworthiness of interactional partners, including coethnics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-104
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Refugee Studies
Volume36
Issue number1
Early online date26 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2023

User-Defined Keywords

  • trust
  • refugee integration
  • social networks
  • exponential random graph model

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