The impact of traditional and nontraditional media forms in the 1992 presidential election

Jack M. McLeod, Steve Z S GUO, Katie Daily, Catherine A. Steele, Huiping Huang, Edward Horowitz, Huailin Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data collected from two surveys in 1992, one cross-sectional and one two-wave panel, are used to examine the predictive patterns of traditional and nontraditional media forms on people's campaign interest, campaign information processing strategies, campaign participation, knowledge of candidates' issue positions, affect and image favorability toward candidates, perceived votes for candidates, and issue salience. Applying three incremental levels of controls, nontraditional media were found to have the strongest impact on labile characteristics (e.g., campaign interest) and weakest impact on criteria more difficult to alter, such as knowledge of candidates' issue positions. Traditional media forms continue to have a potent influence greater than that of nontraditional media forms on the campaign.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-416
Number of pages16
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quarterly
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Communication

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