The impact of perceived discrimination on personality among Chinese migrant children: The moderating role of parental support

Xiaoping Xiang, Daniel Fu Keung Wong, Ke Hou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background:Previous research has indicated that perceived discrimination has harmful effects on migrant children?s physical, mental and behavioral health. However, little is known as to whether these harmful effects cumulate to impact on migrant children?s personalities.Aims:This study examines the effect of perceived discrimination on personality, as well as the moderating role of parental support in the discrimination?personality linkage.Methods:A purposeful convenience sample of 215 migrant children in Beijing, China, completed a standardized questionnaire.Results:Migrant children experienced a moderate level of perceived discrimination, with Form 8 students experiencing greater discrimination than lower grades and those with lower family incomes also experiencing greater discrimination than those with higher family incomes. Perceived discrimination significantly predicted neuroticism; parental support significantly predicted extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness, but the moderating effect of parental support was only marginally significant for the relation between discrimination and conscientiousness.Conclusion:This study underlines the need for researchers and policy makers to pay more attention to the impact of perceived discrimination on migrant children?s personality development.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-257
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of perceived discrimination on personality among Chinese migrant children: The moderating role of parental support'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this