The effects of a Chinese medicinal suppository (Vitalliver) on insulin-like growth factor 1 and homocysteine in patients with hepatitis B infection

S. H. Chui, K. Chan*, A. K.K. Chui, L. S.L. Shek, Ricky N S WONG

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The liver is the major organ for the metabolism of homocysteine (Hey) and production of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Hey metabolism and IGF-1 synthesis may be impaired in chronic liver diseases. The study investigated the regulatory effect of a Chinese herbal suppository, Vitalliver, on Hey and IGF-1, as well as their relationship in patients with hepatitis B infection. Forty patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection without cirrhosis, 25 males and 15 females, were observed for changes in Hcy and IGF-1 after the administration of Vitalliver (one nightly) for a period of 3 months. Serum levels of Hcy, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were measured at baseline, and at 1 month and 3 months after treatment. Vitalliver reduced Hey levels significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.7 ± 2.8 to 9.0 ± 2.1 μmol/L after treatment of 3 months. Furthermore, the IGF-1 levels increased significantly (p < 0.001) from 170.2 ± 81.8 to 212.8 ± 80.9 ng/mL at 1 month and 187.5 ± 72.3 ng/mL at 3 months (p = 0.001) after treatment. In conclusion, it is speculated Vitalliver may have a self-regulatory effect on the release of IGF-1 in HBV patients without liver cirrhosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)674-678
Number of pages5
JournalPhytotherapy Research
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Pharmacology

User-Defined Keywords

  • Hepatitis B infection
  • Homocysteine
  • Vitalliver

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