The crosstalk of pathways involved in immune response maybe the shared molecular basis of rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes

Xuyan Niu, Cheng Lu, Cheng Xiao, Na Ge, Miao Jiang, Li Li, Yanqin Bian, Gang Xu, Zhaoxiang BIAN, Ge ZHANG, Aiping LYU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are both systemic diseases linked with altered immune response, moderate mortality when present together. The treatment for both RA and T2D are not satisfied, partly because of the linkage between them has not yet been appreciated. A comprehensive study for the potential associations between the two disorders is needed. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to explore the differently expressed genes (DEGs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 10 RA and 10 T2D patients comparing with 10 healthy volunteers (control). We used bioinformatics analysis and the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to predict the commonalities on signaling pathways and molecular networks between those two diseases. 212 DEGs in RA and 114 DEGs in T2D patients were identified compared with healthy controls, respectively. 32 DEGs were shared between the two comparisons. The top 10 shared pathways interacted in cross-talking networks, regulated by 5 shared predicted upstream regulators, leading to the activated immune response were explored, which was considered as partly of the association mechanism of this two disorders. These discoveries would be considered as new understanding on the associations between RA and T2D, and provide novel treatment or prevention strategy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number134990
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Aug 2015

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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