The Biomechanics of Shoulder Movement with Implications for Shoulder Injury in Table Tennis: A Minireview

Liang Li, Feng Ren*, Julien S. Baker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A high proportion of shoulder injuries in table tennis players are common, which is both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. An understanding of the interaction between biomechanical function of the shoulder and mechanisms of shoulder injuries in table tennis players is necessary to prevent injury and to conduct clinical treatment of the shoulder as soon as possible. The purpose of this minireview was to select the available evidence on the biomechanical characteristics of shoulder movement and potential relationships with various shoulder injuries that are common in table tennis players. Five studies revealed interesting biomechanical characteristics of shoulder movement patterns in table tennis players: Large internal rotation torque, an increased torsion-rotation movement, and a greater angular velocity of internal rotation were found. Two studies were noted that were related to specific shoulder injury: Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) and impingement syndrome. Unfortunately, it is difficult to draw conclusions on the mechanisms of shoulder injury in table tennis players due to the little evidence available that has investigated shoulder injury mechanisms based on biomechanical characteristics. Future studies should focus on the potential relationship between the biomechanical characteristics of the shoulder and injury prevalence to provide valuable reference data for clinical treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9988857
JournalApplied Bionics and Biomechanics
Volume2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 May 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomedical Engineering

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