Thank God she’s not sick: Health and disciplinary practice among Salvadoran women in northern New Jersey

Caroline Kerner, Adrian J. BAILEY, Alison Mountz, Ines Miyares, Richard A. Wright

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Public health literature suggests that immigrant Latina women and their children have low rates of health care coverage and utilization in the United States (Chavez et al. 1997; Flores and Vega 1998; Guendelman et al. 1995; Halfon et al. 1997; Zambrana et al. 1994). Recent media reports further dramatize this situation in the context of significant declines in rates of benefit receipt for some non-citizens. For example, the share of welfare benefits received by non-citizen households fell at twice the rate for US citizens between 1996 and 1999. In Los Angeles County, applications for public aid by legal immigrants dropped by 71 percent (Brandon 1999).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGeographies of Women's Health
Subtitle of host publicationPlace, Diversity and Difference
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Pages127-142
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781134562497
ISBN (Print)041523607X, 9780415695336
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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