Testing Effects of Wishful Thinking and Similarity on Identification and Narrative Persuasion

Tae Kyoung Lee, Michael A. Shapiro, Shuo Zhou

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Previous studies have linked identification with a story character to persuasion. To explain how identification is formed and influences persuasive effects of a narrative, this study examines audience members’ wishful thinking (their desire to be like a story character) and perceived similarity with a story character. In an experiment, after risk perception was manipulated, participants listened to a story in which story characters did or did not get in a car accident. The results showed that in both risk perception conditions, participants were more likely to identify with story characters who did not get into a car accident, indicating that wishful thinking leads to identification. In addition, wishful thinking mediated the effect of the story on participants’ behavioral intention to engage in safe driving; but identification and perceived similarity did not mediate the effect.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2015
EventICA 2015 - 65th Annual International Communication Association Conference: Communication Across the Life Span - San Juan, Puerto Rico
Duration: 21 May 201525 May 2015
https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ica/ica15/

Conference

ConferenceICA 2015 - 65th Annual International Communication Association Conference
Country/TerritoryPuerto Rico
CitySan Juan
Period21/05/1525/05/15
Internet address

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