Social order, leisure, or tourist attraction? The changing planning missions for waterfront space in Hong Kong

Darren Man Wai Cheung*, Bo Sin Tang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Urban waterfronts gain more attention in the 21st century. While waterfront uses are often contested between the government and the community, the literature suggests that economic and property interests generally play significant roles in waterfront redevelopment. Relatively less emphasis is found in the literature to perceive the waterfront as a place for leisure and recreation. This study examines the changing missions for the Victoria Harbour waterfront in Hong Kong. Three epochs of harbour waterfront planning and development are discussed. It argues that leisure and recreational functions are provided in an auxiliary manner in all the three periods of waterfront development. The 19th century Praya aimed at enhancing social order, improving harbour appearance, and providing public access. The 20th century waterfront faced a competing demand between a place for tourism and a place for local people. The contemporary waterfront is further transformed under a selective logic, bringing tourists to the inner harbour waterfront and pushing local recreational needs to the outer harbour waterfront. The harbour waterfront is gradually emerging into a festival market type waterfront.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-240
Number of pages10
JournalHabitat International
Volume47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

User-Defined Keywords

  • Waterfront
  • Recreation
  • Open space
  • Hong Kong
  • Victoria harbour

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