Role Stressors, Interrole Conflict, and Well-Being: The Moderating Influence of Spousal Support and Coping Behaviors among Employed Parents in Hong Kong

Samuel Aryee*, Vivienne Luk, Alicia S M LEUNG, Susanna Y F LO

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

279 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between role stressors, interrole conflict, and well-being and the moderating influences of spousal support and coping behaviors among a sample of Hong Kong Chinese employed parents in dual-earner families (N= 243). The results revealed that while parental overload was related to family-work conflict (FWC), work overload was related to both work-family conflict (WFC) and FWC. Spousal support moderated the effect of parental overload on FWC. The findings further revealed that FWC was negatively related to job and life satisfaction, but neither WFC nor FWC was related to family satisfaction. Emotion- and problem-focused coping were related to job and family satisfaction, but only emotion-focused coping was related to life satisfaction. However, with the exception of the moderating influence of emotion-focused coping on the relationship between FWC and job satisfaction, the coping behaviors were largely ineffective. Limitations of the study and an organizational role in managing the work-family interface of employed parents are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-278
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1999

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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