Research on Interpreter Training: A Review of Studies in the New Millennium

Jackie Xiu Yan*, Jun PAN, Honghua Wang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

The new millennium has witnessed a boom of interpreter training programs worldwide and the rapid development of the language services industry. A systematic investigation of interpreter training is therefore called for to reveal current trends and future directions. This study is based on a database of articles from ten translation and interpreting journals, constructed and developed by the authors. Several research methods were used to analyze the data including thematic analysis, publication counting and title analysis. A multi-classification scheme was used, as a result of a combination of top-down and bottom-up procedures. Three major themes emerged from the thematic analysis: teaching, learning and assessment. The study also presents the geographical features of research on interpreting training and the results of institution and author analysis. Findings of the study can shed light on what the major issues are in interpreter training, how interpreter training should be performed, and who the active figures are in this field. The database constructed is of value to trainers, trainees and researchers alike. Future research directions are also pointed out at the end of the study.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNew Frontiers in Translation Studies
PublisherSpringer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH
Pages59-75
Number of pages17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Publication series

NameNew Frontiers in Translation Studies
ISSN (Print)2197-8689
ISSN (Electronic)2197-8697

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

User-Defined Keywords

  • Interpreter training
  • Journal articles
  • Thematic analyses

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