Reducing the Spoiler Effect in Experiential Consumption

Alex S. L. Tsang, Dengfeng Yan

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

It is commonly believed that a consumer’s interest in consuming a particular narrative (e.g., a movie) will be significantly reduced after exposure to a spoiler (e.g., the murderer’s identity in a detective movie). Our study applies affective forecasting and focusing illusion bias to explain the psychological process that underlies the spoiler effect. We argue that a spoiler produces unfavorable forecasted affects because focusing illusion narrows people’s attention to the plot. Based on this premise, we suggest a method by which marketers can reduce the negative impact of spoilers on consumers’ behavior intention. These objectives will be accomplished through two experiments.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2008 Association for Consumer Research North American Conference Proceedings
EditorsAnn L. McGill, Sharon Shavitt
PublisherAssociation for Consumer Research
Pages708-709
Number of pages2
Volume36
ISBN (Print)0915552639
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event2008 Association for Consumer Research North American Conference - San Francisco, United States
Duration: 23 Oct 200826 Oct 2008

Publication series

NameAdvances in Consumer Research
Volume36
ISSN (Print)0098-9258

Conference

Conference2008 Association for Consumer Research North American Conference
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period23/10/0826/10/08

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