Purification and partial structural characterization of a complement fixating polysaccharide from rhizomes of Ligusticum chuanxiong

Yuan Feng Zou, Yu Ping Fu, Xing Fu Chen*, Ingvild Austarheim, Kari Tvete Inngjerdingen, Chao Huang, Lemlem Dugassa Eticha, Xu Song, Lixia Li, Bin Feng, Chang Liang He, Zhong Qiong Yin, Berit Smestad Paulsen, Simon Q B HAN

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rhizome of Ligusticum chuanxiong is an effective medical plant, which has been extensively applied for centuries in migraine and cardiovascular diseases treatment in China. Polysaccharides from this plant have been shown to have interesting bioactivities, but previous studies have only been performed on the neutral polysaccharides. In this study, LCP-I-I, a pectic polysaccharide fraction, was obtained from the 100°C water extracts of L. chuangxiong rhizomes and purified by diethylaminethyl (DEAE) sepharose anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Monosaccharide analysis and linkage determination in addition to Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer and Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum, indicated that LCP-I-I is a typical pectic polysaccharide, with homo-galacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan type I regions and arabinogalactan type I and type II (AG-I/AG-II) side chains. LCP-I-I exhibited potent complement fixation activity, ICH50 of 26.3 ± 2.2 μg/mL, and thus has potential as a natural immunomodulator.

Original languageEnglish
Article number287
JournalMolecules
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

User-Defined Keywords

  • Complement system
  • Ligusticum chuanxiong
  • Pectic polysaccharide
  • Polysaccharides
  • Purification

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Purification and partial structural characterization of a complement fixating polysaccharide from rhizomes of Ligusticum chuanxiong'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this