Public health outcomes of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies in the built environment

Sotiris Vardoulakis*, Clive Shrubsole, James Milner, Ian Ridley, Phillip Biddulph, Ka Man LAI, Paul Wilkinson, Zaid Chalabi, Marcella Ucci, Michael Davies

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Climate change mitigation and adaptation policies in the built environment can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and also bring ancillary public health benefits by reducing coldrelated mortality and indoor air pollution. However, increased airtightness of dwellings may have some negative effects on health related to thermal stress and chemical and biological contamination, if adequate ventilation is not maintained. A modelling case study focusing on indoor PM2.5 in London dwellings shows that personal exposure and related health impacts can be substantially reduced if energy efficiency measures, combined with mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR), are implemented. These findings have implications for policies aiming to mitigate climate change and improve energy efficiency of dwellings.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012
Pages687-692
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012 - Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Duration: 8 Jul 201212 Jul 2012

Publication series

Name10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012
Volume1

Conference

Conference10th International Conference on Healthy Buildings 2012
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CityBrisbane, QLD
Period8/07/1212/07/12

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering

User-Defined Keywords

  • Energy efficiency
  • Environmental exposure
  • Heat stress
  • Indoor air quality
  • Ventilation

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