Population migration and urbanization in China: A comparative analysis of the 1990 Population Census and the 1995 National One Percent Sample Population Survey

Si Ming LI*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the changing pattern of population migration and its implications for the urbanization process in China as revealed by the 1990 Population Census and the 1995 National One Percent Sample Population Survey. It is found that, in comparison with the period 1985-90, migration in the period 1990-95 tended to be more distance sensitive, reflecting the increase in the number of migration foci resulting from the policy of opening on all fronts. Foreign investment also appears to have a greater effect on migration flow. Proportionately, there was an increase in both village-to-village and city-to-city migrations. The former was most sensitive to increase in distance while the latter was least sensitive. As for rural-to-urban flows, which include both village-to-town and village-to-city flows, migrants in China increasingly bypassed the towns and ended up in the cities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-685
Number of pages31
JournalInternational Migration Review
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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