Photocatalytic activity of graphene oxide-TiO2 nanocomposite on dichlorvos and malathion and assessment of toxicity changes due to photodegradation

Reeti Kumar, Liya George, Jun Zhao, Suparna Mukherji*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heterogeneous photocatalysis was used for the removal of two widely used organophosphorus pesticides, dichlorvos, and malathion from water. Graphene oxide-TiO2 nanocomposite (GOT) was synthesized and used as a photocatalyst for the removal of these pesticides. Batch studies for optimizing photocatalytic degradation and mineralization of pesticides over 80 min were conducted by varying the pH (2–10), catalyst dose (20 mg/L-200 mg/L), and initial pesticide concentration (0.5 mg/L-20 mg/L), and the irradiation source (125 W UV and visible lamp). Degradation kinetics for the pesticides were evaluated. Ellman assay was used to estimate the toxic effect of pesticides and evaluate toxicity reduction due to treatment. The highest degradation and mineralization of dichlorvos and malathion was observed at pH 6 and the optimum catalyst dose was 60 mg/L. Under UV irradiation, 80% and 90% degradation were observed for dichlorvos and malathion, respectively for 0.5 mg/L initial pesticide concentration. The photocatalytic degradation reaction followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics. A high degree of mineralization was achieved for both the pesticides. Analysis of the results revealed that the residual toxic effect after photocatalysis was primarily due to the residual parent compound. A comparative study revealed that GOT yielded better pesticide degradation compared to commercially available TiO2 under both UV and visible irradiation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number136402
JournalChemosphere
Volume308, Part 2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

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