Pastoralism and conservation: The politics and notions of environmental justice under the grazing ban policy in Inner Mongolia, China

Xinxin Wang, Kevin Lo*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Environmental justice is a key concept for understanding the contested relationship between pastoralism and conservation. Our study adopted a political approach to examine conservation, pastoralism, and justice in the context of the grazing ban policy in China. Employing a qualitative, in-depth case study, we investigated the local political actors and processes that lead to environmental (in)justice. The evidence shows how injustice is perpetuated by both centralized and decentralized political processes and how herders use their knowledge and strategies in resistance to the injustice. In addition, the study contributed to a pluralistic understanding of justice by examining the different notions of justice held by the herders. We found that herders perceive injustices through different lenses, namely economic, ecological, and cultural aspects. Further, the similarities and differences between Han and Mongolian herders are discussed in terms of their notions of environmental justice and counteractions.
Original languageEnglish
Article number102779
Number of pages11
JournalPolitical Geography
Volume99
Early online date27 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2022

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science

User-Defined Keywords

  • China
  • Conservation
  • Environmental justice
  • Environmental politics
  • Grazing ban
  • Pastoralism

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