Organizational Trust in the Age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Shifts in the Form, Production, and Targets of Trust

Fabrice Lumineau, Oliver Schilke*, Wenqian Wang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this essay, we argue that the advent of the Fourth Industrial Revolution calls for a reexamination of trust patterns within and across organizations. We identify fundamental changes in terms of (1) what form organizational trust takes, (2) how it is produced, and (3) who needs to be trusted. First, and most broadly, trust is likely to become more impersonal and systemic. Trust between actors is increasingly substituted by trust in a system based on digital technology. Second, in terms of trust production modes, characteristic- and institution-based trust production will gain in importance. Third, despite the move toward system trust, there will nonetheless be a need to trust certain individuals; however, these trustees are no longer the counterparts to the interaction but rather third parties in charge of the technological systems and data. Thus, the focal targets of interpersonal trust are changing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-34
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Management Inquiry
Volume32
Issue number1
Early online date22 Sept 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2023

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management

User-Defined Keywords

  • collaboration
  • digitalization
  • research agenda
  • technological innovation
  • trust

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Organizational Trust in the Age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Shifts in the Form, Production, and Targets of Trust'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this