One person, three identities? Examining re-politicization of ethnic, national, and Australian identities among 1.5-generation Taiwanese immigrants in Australia

Yao-Tai LI*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Immigrants of the 1.5-generation (1.5-ers) differ from first- and second-generation immigrants because they are generally better immersed in the culture of the host society than the first generation; yet, compared to the second generation, they often have to renegotiate their identities in relation to parents, colleagues at work, and people in the host society during the processes of migration. Drawing on interview data from Taiwanese 1.5-ers in Australia, this article takes a further step and points out that in addition to the identity struggle between home and host country, Taiwanese 1.5-ers also identify as ethnic Chinese (Huaren) and constantly negotiate between these three identities (Huaren, Taiwanese, and Australian). This article argues that identity negotiation and hybridization is in nature a re-politicization process in which respondents are fully aware of the political meanings and power disparities of each identity. It is also a process whereby Taiwanese 1.5-ers mobilize, downplay, and hybridize specific identities based on time and context.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Sociology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

User-Defined Keywords

  • 1.5-generation immigrants
  • ethnicity
  • hybridity
  • identity re-politicization
  • power disparity
  • Taiwanese Australians

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