On the Information Contents of Indirect Citations

Kim Sau Chung*, Meng Yu Liang, Melody Lo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Citation indices, originally designed to measure influence, in practice are often repurposed by administrators and funding agencies as proxies for quality. Suppose there are more researchers in the mainstream than in the fringe, and it takes a higher quality to have the same influence across groups than within groups. Then, controlling for quality, a mainstream researcher may receive more citations than a fringe researcher. To correct for this mainstream bias, a citation index may need to be increasing in direct citations but decreasing in indirect citations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-173
Number of pages18
JournalCanadian Journal of Economics
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

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