Migration and political institutions: Other side of the hill

Kin Ming WONG*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present paper examines the effect of migrant population on political institutions in their host societies using data from the local elections in Hong Kong. The share of the population that has migrated from mainland China is found to have a positive effect on the pro-government votes in local elections. This effect continues to exist after demographic characteristics are controlled. Further investigation suggests that the effect of migrant population on voting patterns varies across periods of migration to Hong Kong. These findings contribute to the published literature in two ways. First, they provide evidence that the effects of migration on political development are two-way. Migration not only influences the political institutions in migrants’ home countries, but also shapes the political institutions in their host regions. Second, they also pave the way for future research on why and how periods of migration influence migrant populations’ voting patterns in their host regions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-69
Number of pages16
JournalPacific Economic Review
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

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