Measures of Environmental Correlates of Physical Activity for Urban Chinese Preschool-Aged Children: Development and Reliability

Yi Nam Suen, Ester Cerin*, Wendy Y J HUANG, Robin R. Mellecker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We adapted/developed and examined the test–retest reliability and internal consistency of eight parent-report measures of home and neighborhood environmental correlates of physical activity appropriate for Chinese preschool-aged children and their parents/primary caregivers living in densely populated urban environments. This study consisted of a qualitative (cognitive interviews) and a quantitative (test–retest reliability) component. Chinese versions of the measures were pilot-tested on 20 parents of Hong Kong preschool-aged children using cognitive interviews. Measures were then administered to 61 parents twice, 1 week apart. Test–retest reliability and internal consistency were computed. Except for two items, the test–retest reliability of items and scale summary scores ranged from moderate to excellent. The internal consistency of the measures exceeded recommended minimal values (Cronbach’s α >.70). The parent-report measures examined in this study are potentially appropriate for use in investigations of environmental correlates of the physical activity of Chinese preschool-aged children living in densely populated urban environments. However, their predictive validity with respect to Chinese preschool-aged children’s physical activity needs to be assessed in future studies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSAGE Open
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jul 2015

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

User-Defined Keywords

  • built environment
  • Chinese
  • parental perceptions
  • social-ecologic model
  • young children

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