Kant's religious argument for the existence of god: The ultimate dependence of human destiny on divine assistance

Stephen R PALMQUIST*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After reviewing Kant's well-known criticisms of the traditional proofs of God's existence and his preferred moral argument, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a densely-packed theistic argument in Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason. Humanity's ultimate moral destiny can be fulfi lled only through organized religion, for only by participating in a religious community (or "church") can we overcome the evil in human nature. Yet we cannot conceive how such a community can even be founded without presupposing God's existence. Viewing God as the internal moral lawgiver, empowering a community of believers, is Kant's ultimate rationale for theistic belief.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-22
Number of pages20
JournalFaith and Philosophy
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Religious studies
  • Philosophy

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