Penicillium species as chassis for biomanufacturing and environmental sustainability in the modern era: Progress, challenges, and future perspective

Ifunanya R. Akaniro*, Ikenna V. Chibuike, Emmanuel C. Onwujekwe, Francis A. Gbadamosi, Deborah O. Enyi, Oge N. Onwe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In modern research, biomanufacturing and environmental sustainability are widely explored areas considering their roles in the production of chemicals, materials and energy, as well as practices that underpin societal growth and well-being. Penicillium is one of the most diverse microbial groups found in the natural environment. Occurring in several habitats including soil, air, endophytic tissues of plants, insect guts, animal intestines and the extremophiles, the Penicillium genus is considered as a versatile microbial group comprising species that synthesize a wide array of bioactive secondary metabolites with wide range of environmental applications. The in-depth explorations of the biosynthetic and/or degradative machinery of Penicillium species offer excellent opportunities to augment the synthesis of desirable products that facilitate the removal of soil–water pollutants and improve the overall health of the environment (i.e., plant, soil, animal and human health) at low costs. This review discusses the current state of knowledge and challenges relating to the biotechnological application of Penicillium species in bioremediation, biofuel production and food fermentation, as well as some recommendations for future research directions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100326
Number of pages24
JournalFungal Biology Reviews
Volume46
Early online date2 Jun 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Microbiology

User-Defined Keywords

  • Biofuel production
  • Bioremediation
  • Ecological health
  • Food production

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