Interventions to prevent obesity in children aged 12 to 18 years old 

Theresa HM Moore*, Eve Tomlinson, Francesca Spiga, Julian PT Higgins, Yang Gao, Deborah M Caldwell, James Nobles, Sarah Dawson, Sharea Ijaz, Jelena Savovic, Rebecca K Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Russell Jago, Sophie Phillips, Frances Hillier-Brown, Carolyn D Summerbell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives

This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (intervention). The objectives are as follows:

The overall aim of the review is to determine the effectiveness of interventions to prevent obesity in 12 to 18‐year‐old children and adolescents.

The four objectives are:

1. to evaluate the effects of interventions that aim to modify dietary intake on changes in zBMI score, BMI and serious adverse events among children and adolescents;

2. to evaluate the effects of interventions that aim to modify physical activity, sedentary behaviour, sleep, play and/or structured exercise on changes in zBMI score, BMI and serious adverse events among children and adolescents;

3. to evaluate the combined effects of interventions that aim to modify both dietary intake and physical activity/movement behaviours on changes in zBMI score, BMI and serious adverse events among children and adolescents;

4. to compare the effects of interventions that aim to modify dietary interventions with those that aim to modify physical activity/movement behaviours on changes in zBMI score, BMI and serious adverse events among children.

The secondary objectives are designed to explore if, how, and why the effectiveness of interventions on zBMI/BMI varies depending on the following PROGRESS factors.

- Place of residence

- Race/ethnicity/culture/language

- Occupation

- Gender/sex

- Religion

- Education

- Socioeconomic status

- Social capital

The PROGRESS acronym is intended to ensure that there is explicit consideration of health inequity, the unfair difference in disease burden, when conducting research and adapting research evidence to inform the design of new interventions (O'Neill 2014). The PROGRESS acronym describes factors that contribute to health inequity. Recent work on race and religion in the UK suggested that consideration of these factors is critical to the design of new interventions (Rai 2019).

We will also collect, from RCTs, information about the costs of interventions so that policymakers can use the review as a source of information from which they may prepare cost‐effectiveness analyses.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberCD015330
JournalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Volume2022
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2022

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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