Intermedia attribute agenda-setting among Hong Kong, U.S. and Mainland Chinese media: The case of Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests

Yining Fan*, Vincent Pak Hong Wong

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

    Abstract

    This study integrates the Protest Paradigm into the analysis of intermedia agenda-setting and investigates the transfer of news attributes among major newspapers in Hong Kong, the U.S., and Mainland China concerning the 2019 anti-extradition bill protests, which is the largest and longest social movement in the history of Hong Kong. A total of 9,646 news headlines and headings were content analyzed. A series of Granger causality tests revealed that the direction of influence was primarily from China to the U.S., contrary to previous findings that attribute agendas flowed primarily from the U.S. to other countries. Consistent with the prediction of second-level agenda-setting effect, dominant news attributes about the protest transferred from the more “elite” U.S. media to the lower-level Hong Kong newspapers, yet results also showed a bottom-up effect with Hong Kong newspapers influencing U.S. ones in setting the news agenda regarding Chinese authority and international society.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020
    EventAssociation for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) 2020 Conference - San Francisco, United States
    Duration: 6 Aug 20209 Aug 2020
    https://aejmc.org/events/sanfrancisco20/

    Conference

    ConferenceAssociation for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) 2020 Conference
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    Period6/08/209/08/20
    Internet address

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