Interim follow-up of a randomized controlled trial comparing Chinese style mind body (Tai Chi) and stretching exercises on cognitive function in subjects at risk of progressive cognitive decline

Linda C.W. Lam*, Rachel C.M. Chau, Billy M.L. Wong, Ada W.T. Fung, Victor W.C. Lui, Cindy C.W. Tam, Grace T.Y. Leung, Timothy C.Y. Kwok, Helen F.K. Chiu, Sammy Ng, W.M. Chan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

130 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives
We reported the interim findings of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to examine the effects of a mind body physical exercise (Tai Chi) on cognitive function in Chinese subjects at risk of cognitive decline.
Subjects
389 Chinese older persons with either a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR 0.5) or amnestic-MCI participated in an exercise program. The exercise intervention lasted for 1 year; 171 subjects were trained with 24 forms simplified Tai Chi (Intervention, I) and 218 were trained with stretching and toning exercise (Control, C). The exercise comprised of advised exercise sessions of at least three times per week.
Results
At 5th months (2 months after completion of training), both I and C subjects showed an improvement in global cognitive function, delayed recall and subjective cognitive complaints (paired t-tests, p Conclusions
Our interim findings showed that Chinese style mind body (Tai Chi) exercise may offer specific benefits to cognition, potential clinical interests should be further explored with longer observation period. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)733-740
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

User-Defined Keywords

  • mild cognitive impairment
  • physical activity
  • clinical trial

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