Integrating Risk Perception Attitude Framework and the Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Mental Health Promotion Behaviors among Young Adults

Jingyuan SHI*, Hye Kyung Kim

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mental disorder is a pressing public health issue in Singapore, especially among young adults. By integrating the risk perception attitude (RPA) framework and the theory of planned behavior (TPB), this study examines psychosocial factors underlying two mental health promotion behaviors–seeking counseling and employing self-help methods–among young Singaporeans. The results of an online survey (n = 232) showed that, as predicted by RPA framework, perceived risk interacted with self-efficacy to affect behavioral intention to seek counseling. However, this interaction existed only among individuals with favorable attitudes toward counseling-seeking behavior and not among those with unfavorable attitudes. In addition, the interaction between perceived risk and self-efficacy was not significant for the intention to perform self-help methods. The current findings demonstrated that the nature of focal behavior and attitudes are boundary conditions of the interaction effect between perceived risk and efficacy, which is the core premise of the RPA framework. These findings offer practical implications for developing campaign strategies to promote mental well-being among young adults in Singapore.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)597-606
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Communication
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2020

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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