Institutional prestige, academic supervision and research productivity of international PhD students: Evidence from Chinese returnees

Wenqin Shen, Jin Jiang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Since the emergence of global university rankings in the 2000s, East Asian universities have been recruiting academics with doctoral degrees from Western countries to strengthen their competitiveness in the global university league tables. Governments offer scholarships to support students in their overseas doctoral studies and encourage graduates to return. Although much attention is given to researchers with overseas degrees, little is known about their experiences and pre-employment academic productivity. Drawing on a nationwide survey and bibliometric data, this study examines whether and how the institutional prestige of a host university and academic supervision contribute to the academic productivity of government-funded Chinese PhD returnees during their doctoral studies. Results show that supervisors’ research support and collaboration positively affect pre-employment academic productivity. However, a university's prestige does not exert such an influence. Moreover, co-authorship with a supervisor is a crucial mechanism in the influence of supervisors’ research support on PhD students’ productivity.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Sociology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Nov 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

User-Defined Keywords

  • PhD returnees
  • bibliometric data
  • doctoral supervisor
  • international students
  • research collaboration
  • research productivity

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