Impact of high-intensity interval training and moderate-intensity continuous training on resting and postexercise cardiac troponin T concentration

Jinlei Nie*, Haifeng Zhang, Zhaowei Kong, Keith George, Jonathan P. Little, Tom K K TONG, Feifei Li, Qingde Shi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Does exercise training impact resting and postexercise cardiac troponin T (cTnT) concentration? What is the main finding and its importance? This randomized controlled intervention study demonstrated that 12 weeks of either high-intensity interval training or moderate-intensity continuous training largely abolished the exercise-induced elevation in cTnT when exercise was performed at the same absolute intensity. There was no impact of training on resting cTnT or postexercise appearance of cTnT when exercise was performed at the same relative intensity. These findings provide new information that might help clinicians with decision-making in relationship to basal and postexercise values of cTnT in individuals with different training status. Abstract: We evaluated the influence of 12 weeks of high-intensity interval training [HIIT; repeated 4 min cycling at 90% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) interspersed with 3 min rest, 200–300 kJ per session, 3 or 4 days each week] and work-equivalent moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT; continuous cycling at 60% (VO2max) on resting cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and the appearance of exercise-induced cTnT. Forty-eight sedentary obese young women were randomly assigned to HIIT, MICT or a control group. The (VO2max) and body composition were measured before and after training. At baseline, cTnT was assessed using a high-sensitivity assay at rest and immediately, 2 and 4 h after 45 min cycling at 60% (VO2max). After a 12 week training period, cTnT was assessed before and after 45 min cycling at the same relative and absolute intensities as before training. Training led to higher (VO2max) and lower fat mass in both HIIT and MICT groups (all P < 0.05). Before training, cTnT was significantly elevated in all three groups (by 35–118%, all P < 0.05) with acute exercise. After training, both resting and postexercise cTnT concentrations (same relative intensity) were similar to pretraining values. In contrast, postexercise cTnT (same absolute intensity, which represented a smaller exercise stimulus) was not elevated from rest in both HIIT and MICT groups. In conclusion, 12 weeks of either HIIT or MICT largely abolished the postexercise elevation of cTnT concentration when exercise was performed at the same absolute intensity. There was, however, no impact of training on resting cTnT or postexercise appearance of cTnT for exercise performed at the same relative intensity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-380
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental Physiology
Volume103
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Physiology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Physiology (medical)

User-Defined Keywords

  • cardiac biomarker
  • high-intensity interval training
  • moderate-intensity continuous training

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