Identifying active hot-issue communicators and subgroup identifiers: Examining the situational theory of problem solving

Yi-Ru Regina Chen, Flora C J Hung-Baesecke, Jeong Nam Kim

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

This study used the situational theory of problem solving (STOPS) to examine communication behaviors of the publics formed around a government policy issue attracting intense media coverage in a Chinese society. Results of surveying 748 participants online support the utility of STOPS to identify the hot-issue public with active communication from the general population in a Chinese context. Results of examining the two cross-situational variables’ impact on the situational variables (program recognition, constraint recognition, involvement recognition, and referent criterion) indicate that party identity serves as a better identifier of subgroups of the hot-issue public than trust in the government. Theoretical implications for STOPS model in a hot-issue situation and the composition of hot-issue publics as well as practical implications for effective communication targeting the active public arising from the controversy are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2014
EventICA 2014 - 64th Annual International Communication Association Conference: Communication and the Good Life - Seattle, United States
Duration: 22 May 201426 May 2014
https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ica/ica14/

Conference

ConferenceICA 2014 - 64th Annual International Communication Association Conference
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period22/05/1426/05/14
Internet address

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