Hydrocarbons-Driven Crystallization of Polymer Semiconductors for Low-Temperature Fabrication of High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistors

Yanlian Lei, Ping Deng, Qiaoming Zhang, Zuhong Xiong, Qinghua Li, Jiangquan Mai, Xinhui Lu, Xunjin ZHU, Beng ONG*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While many high-performance polymer semiconductors are reported for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), most require a high-temperature postdeposition annealing of channel semiconductors to achieve high performance. This negates the fundamental attribute of OFETs being a low-cost alternative to conventional high-cost silicon technologies. A facile solution process is developed through which high-performance OFETs can be fabricated without thermal annealing. The process involves incorporation of an incompatible hydrocarbon binder or wax into the channel semiconductor composition to drive rapid phase separation and instantaneous crystallization of polymer semiconductor at room temperature. The resulting composite channel semiconductor film manifests a nano/microporous surface morphology with a continuous semiconductor nanowire network. OFET mobility of up to about 5 cm2 V−1 s−1 and on/off ratio ≥ 106 are attained. These are hitherto benchmark performance characteristics for room-temperature, solution-processed polymer OFETs, which are functionally useful for many impactful applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1706372
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume28
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Apr 2018

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

User-Defined Keywords

  • annealing free
  • donor–acceptor polymer semiconductor
  • nanoporous network
  • organic field-effect transistor
  • printed electronics

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