How social influence affects we-intention to use instant messaging: The moderating effect of usage experience

Aaron X.L. Shen*, Christy M K CHEUNG, Matthew K.O. Lee, Huaping Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the advent of Web 2.0, the business world is fast changing its way of communicating and collaborating. In this study, we regarded the use of instant messaging in team collaboration as a social behavior and examined the changing roles of social influence processes in the formation of usage we-intention (i.e. social intention). Building on the belief-desire-intention model and the social influence theory, an integrated model was developed and empirically tested using survey data collected from 482 students. The results demonstrated that desire partially mediates the effects of group norm and social identity on we-intention to use. In addition, the effect of group norm is more significant for users with lower usage experience, whereas the effect of social identity is more significant for users with higher usage experience. We believe this study provides several important implications for both research and practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-169
Number of pages13
JournalInformation Systems Frontiers
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Software
  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Information Systems
  • Computer Networks and Communications

User-Defined Keywords

  • Desire
  • Experience
  • Instant messaging
  • Social computing
  • Social influence
  • We-intention
  • Web 2.0

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