Health policy considerations for combining exercise prescription into noncommunicable diseases treatment: a narrative literature review

Dan Tao, Roger Awan-Scully*, Garrett I. Ash, Yaodong Gu, Zhong Pei, Yang Gao, Alistair Cole, Rashmi Supriya, Yan Sun, Rui Xu, Julien S. Baker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: In this review, we aim to highlight the evidence base for the benefits of exercise in relation to the treatment of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), draw on the Health Triangular Policy Framework to outline the principal facilitators and barriers for implementing exercise in health policy, and make concrete suggestions for action.

Methods: Literature review and framework analysis were conducted to deal with the research questions.

Results: Exercise prescription is a safe solution for noncommunicable diseases prevention and treatment that enables physicians to provide and instruct patients how to apply exercise as an important aspect of disease treatment and management. Combining exercise prescription within routine care, in inpatient and outpatient settings, will improve patients’ life quality and fitness levels.

Conclusion: Inserting exercise prescription into the healthcare system would improve population health status and healthy lifestyles. The suggestions outlined in this study need combined efforts from the medical profession, governments, and policymakers to facilitate practice into reality in the healthcare arena.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1219676
Number of pages10
JournalFrontiers in Public Health
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2023

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

User-Defined Keywords

  • exercise prescription
  • health policy
  • health policy triangle framework
  • medical provision
  • noncommunicable diseases

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