Group psychosocial program for enhancing psychological well-being of people with systemic lupus erythematosus

Petrus Y N NG*, Winky Chan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emotional ups and downs are common among people with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) as they live with fears about treatment, pain from the illness and unexpected "flare-ups." The side effects of medications have a severe impact on their self-esteem and lead to psychological distress. This paper reports a study on the impact of a psychosocial group program on the self-esteem and psychosocial functioning of people with SLE. A total of 56 people with SLE were recruited to participate in a 6-week, 2.5-hour weekly session psychosocial group. The group served to equip members with knowledge and skills to cope with SLE and stress arising from the illness, to enhance their self-confidence and develop a positive attitude toward the illness, and to enhance their social support network. The members were assessed before the commencement and during the last session of the groups with Rosenberg's Self-esteem Inventory and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30). Results showed that members obtained better scores in self-esteem (p < 0.001) and GHQ (p < 0.001) after the group. The study revealed significant positive hanges in self-esteem and psychosocial functioning of people with SLE after the psychosocial group program. The implications for psychosocial rograms for people with SLE are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-87
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jul 2007

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Sociology and Political Science

User-Defined Keywords

  • Group treatment
  • Mental health
  • Psychosocial
  • Self-esteem
  • SLE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Group psychosocial program for enhancing psychological well-being of people with systemic lupus erythematosus'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this