Ground-based vertical profile observations of atmospheric composition on the Tibetan Plateau (2017-2019)

Chengzhi Xing, Cheng Liu*, Hongyu Wu, Jinan Lin, Fan Wang, Shuntian Wang, Meng Gao*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Tibetan Plateau (TP) plays an essential role in modulating regional and global climate, and its influence on climate is also affected by human-related processes, including changes in atmospheric composition. However, observations of atmospheric composition, especially vertical profile observations, remain sparse and rare on the TP, due to extremely high altitude, topographical heterogeneity and the grinding environment. Accordingly, the forcing and feedback of atmospheric composition from rapidly changing surrounding regions to regional environmental and climate change in the TP remains poorly understood. This paper introduces a hightime- resolution (~ 15 min) vertical profile observational dataset of atmospheric composition (aerosols, NO2, HCHO and HONO) on the TP for more than 1 year (2017-2019) using a passive remote sensing technique. The diurnal pattern, vertical distribution and seasonal variations of these pollutants are documented here in detail. The sharing of this dataset would benefit the scientific community in exploring source-receptor relationships and the forcing and feedback of atmospheric composition on the TP to the regional and global climate. It also provides potential to improve satellite retrievals and to facilitate the development and improvement of models in cold regions. The dataset is freely available at Zenodo (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5336460; Xing, 2021).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4897-4912
Number of pages16
JournalEarth System Science Data
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Oct 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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