Globalization and folk theory of social change: How globalization relates to societal perceptions about the past and future

Yoshihisa Kashima*, Junqi Shi, Koji Tsuchiya, Emiko S. Kashima, Shirley Y Y CHENG, Melody Manchi Chao, Shang hui Shin

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    44 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Folk theory of social change (FTSC) is a generic knowledge structure that frames societal perceptions. According to FTSC, society develops from a traditional community where people are trustworthy though unsophisticated to a more sophisticated, but less warm-hearted modern society. People make future forecast about society within this generic structure while flexibly incorporating particular information about the past history and the present social trend. We report evidence for the proposition that globalization provides particular information that people incorporate in forming their future societal perceptions. We take an intranational perspective by examining people's beliefs about globalization (Study 1) and a cross-national perspective by comparing future societal perceptions in People's Republic of China, Japan, and Australia (Study 2). We suggest that future societal perceptions may play a constitutive role in the future of humanity, and FTSC and folk beliefs about globalization are a significant part of this process.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)696-715
    Number of pages20
    JournalJournal of Social Issues
    Volume67
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

    Scopus Subject Areas

    • Social Sciences(all)

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